health & disease

How Are Transportation and Disease Linked?

Dr. Jeff Zimmerman, Iowa State University, shares historical vignettes that highlight how transportation and disease have always been linked. Understanding this connection can help those in agriculture identify and eradicate animal diseases. From the 2010 International PRRS Symposium, December 3 - 4, 2010, Chicago, IL, USA.

PoultryCast 0243, Improving Air Quality In Your Facilities

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PoultryCast update for November 24, 2010, FoodThanks

Sometimes the simplest expression of gratitude are the most profound. This Thanksgiving season, we encourage you to use social media to show just how thankful you are for the food we enjoy every day. In doing so, we will also be thanking those many people and industries who bring food to our tables.

Ways to share? Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn are some starting points.

How Can Bacteriophages Perform As Antibiotic Alternatives?

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Bacteriophages are being considered as viable alternatives to infectious diseases that are no longer responding to antibiotics. Currently waiting U.S. approval, bacteriophages could be used to treat animals and humans.

Bacteriophages -- so named when they were first discovered because they appear to eat bacteria -- are naturally occurring viruses that can infect and kill bacteria.

Currently there are many bacterial diseases that have become resistant to antibiotics. Stronger antibiotics have been used in treatment but at the risk of continue the evolution of the bacteria to become "super-bugs".

Fast forward to the present, where an increasing number of bacteria strains -- often referred to as "super bugs" -- are becoming resistant to antibiotics typically used against them. The fear of seeing human medical science being hurled back into a pre-antibiotic era is ever present.

In the battle against antibiotic resistance in animal agriculture, researchers from Washington and New York states are hoping to help pave the way for U.S. approval of a promising biological therapy that has the potential to not only treat sick cows, but also save human lives threatened by infectious diseases that no longer respond to antibiotics.

What's That Smell? Biofilter To Reduce Odor

What is that smell?

Ted Funk, a University of Illinois Extension agricultural engineer with the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering (ABE), and Matt Robert, an ABE research engineer, constructed two biofilters on the ABE research farm to reduce odor emissions by up to 90%.

"The new design uses 30-inch concrete silo staves that fit together like puzzle pieces," said Robert.

The biofilters media is expected to last between three and five years and cost about dollar per cubic foot per minute (cfm) of air handled.

"Reducing odor and being a good neighbor sound good until it comes to the pocketbook," said Funk. "Biofiltration has been around a long time in other industries, but it's never been brought down to a cost that the livestock industry can handle."

PoultryCast 0238, FDA Antibiotics - Animals - And You. Where Are They Going?

Download mp3PoultryCast 0238 Show Notes: 
  • The Federation of Animal Science Societies (FASS) recently produced a webinar to share perspectives on the sometimes perplexing position of the FDA and animal health products.   This audio segment from the "Antibiotics in Animals and People" presentation features comments from Dr William Flynn of the Food and Drug Administration.  He outlines what the FDA is trying to accomplish and why. 

PoultryCast update for October 13, 2010, Why Do People Think I'm An Animal?

A couple of interesting stories which impact our industry in direct ways are available for your listening. Glynn Tonsor, K-State, reviews data looking at media stories which show our industry in a negative light and how our consumers react at the meat case. The effort to quantify what has been in question will also provide an economic case for developing programs and procedures to further limit inappropriate activities.

PoultryCast 0234, Legislative and Regulatory Attacks On Animal Health

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  • Dr. Liz Wagstrom, associate professor in infectious disease and public health at the Univ of MN presented her view of action in Washington on both legislative and regulatory fronts dealing with animal agriculture's use of antibiotics, public perception and potential industry change. 

PoultryCast update for May 20, 2010, Algae-Based Water Filtration Captures Important Nutrients

A quick note: The Multi-State Poultry Feeding and Nutrition Conference 2010 takes place May 25-27 in Indianapolis, Indiana. The valuable educational program kicks off on Wednesday the 26th with early presentations like Advances in Environmental Nutrition by Dr. Park Waldroup and Early Broiler Responses to Dietary Amino Acids by Dr.

Dr. Patricia Wakenell - Avian Influenza Update


Avian Influenza Update - Dr. Patricia Wakenell, Purdue University, from NIAA's One Health: Implications for Animal Agriculture, March 15 - 17, 2010, Kansas City, MO, USA.

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